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Women's Sweat Lodge Ceremony
Feb 5, 2023
,
1:00 pm
-
5:00 pm
Tarentum, Pa
$ 0 USD

Join us for an ancient purification ceremony based predominantly on Lakota tradition, the inipi, and that honors traditions from tribes throughout the Americas. For the ritual, we'll gather in a dark, covered dome-like structure as water is poured on hot stones heated in a fire. Our guide will also sing traditional ceremonial songs to the beat of a hand drum. Afterward, we will replenish our bodies with a nourishing potluck.The ceremony is physically cleansing as toxins are released through the sweat. Yet more significantly, powerful personal transformation can occur as the emotional blockage is released and insight into one’s path is achieved.

*If you have any medical issues, please let us know before signing up for the ritual.

*In preparation, it is recommended to abstain from drugs and alcohol and reflect upon one’s intentions for the ceremony.

Special note to women: As part of the tradition, women, on their “moon time,” or period, do not participate in the sweat lodge as they are already undergoing purification. You should wait 24 hours after completing your period before entering the sweat lodge area.

What to bring:

Clothes: long dress or long skirt with tee-shirt (cover your shoulders and knees).
Towels: 1 for the lodge and 1 for after.Prepared food for the potluck.Gift for the ceremonial leader -

Although there is no fee for the ceremony, it is customary to give the person leading the ceremony a gift to show appreciation for the time and effort of the ceremony. Financial gifts are especially helpful in paying for the resources used in the ceremony.

This is a free event. Donations are welcomed and appreciated.

A Note From Wanda Who Will Be Leading The Ceremony:

Hello, my name is Wanda.

I will be leading the sweat lodge ceremony. Because there have been some concerns raised, I would like to share some information.

I was asked to lead a ceremony for a group of women, and I agreed to do that. I have been somewhat hesitant to open up over the internet for two reasons. The first is that the ceremony will not be at a retreat or wellness center. It will be at my home - where I raise my children. As a mother, my first priority is keeping my children safe. When you open yourself and your home to helping others, it can attract a wide audience with a range of motivations and intentions. Some of those are not always aligned with the well-being of my family.

The second is that I was taught that humility is an important part of these ceremonies. In the traditions I was taught, it is considered rude and disrespectful to state one’s accomplishments, especially in a public forum. The specifics of what I have done, what I have learned, where I learned it, and who taught me are typically shared in a personal setting.

However, in light of the raised concerns, I will share two statements related to my support. I learned this ceremony from Chief Keith Horse Looking Sr. (https://owlbonnet.org). All donations from this ceremony will go to the Owl Bonnet Cultural Preservation organization. Also, from Chief Jake Singer, Traditional Diné (Navajo) Medicine Man, Keeper of the Navajo Warrior Staff, Sun Dance Chief, Ceremonial Leader, Viet Nam Veteran, double Purple Heart Recipient: “I am a full-blooded Navajo and Wounded Warrior. I am Wanda’s uncle and I say she can run sweat ceremonies. If anyone has a problem with that, they can contact me.”


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Join us for an ancient purification ceremony based predominantly on Lakota tradition, the inipi, and that honors traditions from tribes throughout the Americas. For the ritual, we'll gather in a dark, covered dome-like structure as water is poured on hot stones heated in a fire. Our guide will also sing traditional ceremonial songs to the beat of a hand drum. Afterward, we will replenish our bodies with a nourishing potluck.The ceremony is physically cleansing as toxins are released through the sweat. Yet more significantly, powerful personal transformation can occur as the emotional blockage is released and insight into one’s path is achieved.

*If you have any medical issues, please let us know before signing up for the ritual.

*In preparation, it is recommended to abstain from drugs and alcohol and reflect upon one’s intentions for the ceremony.

Special note to women: As part of the tradition, women, on their “moon time,” or period, do not participate in the sweat lodge as they are already undergoing purification. You should wait 24 hours after completing your period before entering the sweat lodge area.

What to bring:

Clothes: long dress or long skirt with tee-shirt (cover your shoulders and knees).
Towels: 1 for the lodge and 1 for after.Prepared food for the potluck.Gift for the ceremonial leader -

Although there is no fee for the ceremony, it is customary to give the person leading the ceremony a gift to show appreciation for the time and effort of the ceremony. Financial gifts are especially helpful in paying for the resources used in the ceremony.

This is a free event. Donations are welcomed and appreciated.

A Note From Wanda Who Will Be Leading The Ceremony:

Hello, my name is Wanda.

I will be leading the sweat lodge ceremony. Because there have been some concerns raised, I would like to share some information.

I was asked to lead a ceremony for a group of women, and I agreed to do that. I have been somewhat hesitant to open up over the internet for two reasons. The first is that the ceremony will not be at a retreat or wellness center. It will be at my home - where I raise my children. As a mother, my first priority is keeping my children safe. When you open yourself and your home to helping others, it can attract a wide audience with a range of motivations and intentions. Some of those are not always aligned with the well-being of my family.

The second is that I was taught that humility is an important part of these ceremonies. In the traditions I was taught, it is considered rude and disrespectful to state one’s accomplishments, especially in a public forum. The specifics of what I have done, what I have learned, where I learned it, and who taught me are typically shared in a personal setting.

However, in light of the raised concerns, I will share two statements related to my support. I learned this ceremony from Chief Keith Horse Looking Sr. (https://owlbonnet.org). All donations from this ceremony will go to the Owl Bonnet Cultural Preservation organization. Also, from Chief Jake Singer, Traditional Diné (Navajo) Medicine Man, Keeper of the Navajo Warrior Staff, Sun Dance Chief, Ceremonial Leader, Viet Nam Veteran, double Purple Heart Recipient: “I am a full-blooded Navajo and Wounded Warrior. I am Wanda’s uncle and I say she can run sweat ceremonies. If anyone has a problem with that, they can contact me.”